Advertising Agencies · Media Buying · Media Planning · Online Media · TRAFFIQ · Uncategorized

Agencies: Working Hard or Hardly Working?

A recent meeting with a large agency’s digital planning team left me wondering who is doing the real work these days: agencies or ad networks? I was there to talk about our solution for making sense of an increasingly crowded and complicated digital space. Today’s media planners and buyers have to be able to navigate through a 300,000 channel world for their clients — and be able to take advantage of dozens of new creative executions, placements, and targeting capabilities. Their clients trust them to find a receptive audience wherever they are on the web — and deliver enough scale and performance to make it effective and affordable.

One of the planners in the room was responsible for a seven-figure pharmaceutical budget. When I asked him how he was evaluating new traffic sources, he said, “I buy on two networks. They find me headache suffers and my client is satisfied, why would I want to risk it by moving money around?”

“I buy on two networks.” Surely he couldn’t be serious.

After I left the meeting, I continued to be astonished by the reply. Sure, buying on those networks was easy (and probably pretty effective) but what was the agency bringing to the table? Why wouldn’t the client simply place those two network buys themselves, and gain an extra 10% in performance by eliminating the agency’s fee?

Furthermore, what if the client’s CMO asked that planner where his ads were running? He couldn’t tell him with any certitude. It seemed to me like a pretty expensive and risky marketing strategy.

The agency is passing along their job along to a network, who is keeping all the data from the campaign. Even if the company sold a ton of migraine pill prescriptions, they still don’t know how they were successful—and who responded to their ads. Even worse, that network can now go and pitch all of the client’s competitors, who now stand to gain for the investment they made building an audience.

If I were the client, I would be justified in firing this agency.

The successful agency not only continually works to discover new pockets of high-performing traffic for their clients but they actively manage the campaign, and share performance results with them. If I want to reach migraine sufferers, the easiest thing in the world is to call WebMD and sponsor their migraine section; I am guaranteed a contextually-relevant placement in a high quality setting. Easy.

Same thing as buying a car. If I want a really reliable German automobile that seats 5 adults, with leather seats, all-wheel drive, and impeccable handling, I just go the Mercedes dealer and pick up a new S-Class.

The problem starts to arise when I get my monthly bill. Is $1,200 a month too much to pay when I can get to work in the same relative comfort in a $600 a month Audi, or a $350 a month Volkswagen?

Maybe, as a media planner, I can find five health sites that target migraine sufferers and string together the same audience for a lot less money. In addition, maybe there are premium opportunities I can get on smaller, more vertically focused sites that the leading site cannot or will not offer me?

Don’t get me wrong, WebMD is a great place to advertise. But that’s something even my mother knows. Do you really need to pay 15% to an agency for them to recommend that strategy?

So, how hard is your agency working for you, anyway? Every advertiser who uses the services of a media agency for their media planning and buying should ask themselves and their agency this question every single day. If they did, I think they would unfortunately find in many cases, the answer to be: not very hard.

How can an agency then justify the fees that they are collecting? They can do it by continually looking for better performing traffic. The only way to do that is to spread dollars around, find pockets of traffic either through other networks, or direct-to-publisher sites. They can do it by deploying smaller per-publisher budgets, while benefiting from smaller incremental risk.

Sure, it will take more work, but that’s what the client is paying for.

[This originally appeared in Adotas on 3/9/2010]

Advertising Agencies · Demand Side Platform (DSP) · Digital Display · Media Buying · Media Planning · Online Media · Publishing · Real Time Bidding (RTB) · Sales · TRAFFIQ

What are we Selling?

Most of us that are involved in sales, marketing, or business development (they are same thing, actually) in the media space don’t really know what they are selling. And I don’t mean that the sales director or your DSP or data company don’t really understand the way their technology works (which can be the case at times). Surely, the digital media salesman can be relied upon to deploy the latest buzzwords, acronyms, and business jargon at the drop of a two-sided, logo-besmirsched business card. (see everyone’s favorite web humor from the year 2000). We all know what product we are selling.

That doesn’t really cover it, though, does it?

What we are really selling is a dream. The dream of a digital future, and the hope that technology continues to be the solution to the problem, rather than another problem itself. It’s becoming a tough sell out there for a few reasons. I think it all started with the flying car. Ever since the car was invented and the first guy has to wait more than 10 seconds for a traffic light, we have all dreamed of the flying car. The personal hovercraft…essentially the DeLorean from Back to the Future, without the time machine capabilities. That thing was promised to us (coming soon!) way back in the 1950s. It was even clear, not so far back as the 70’s, that we would–with certainty–have something like that by the turn of the century. Well, it’s 2010 and we are all still waiting. The way traffic is getting around New York, Los Angeles and China (they had a traffic jam that lasted a week, recently), we are going to need them soon. Now, even though we still want them, nobody ever talks about them anymore.

I hope that’s not what happens to us. We are out there selling the future of advertising, and the future of how it’s measured, bought, sold, traded, served, shown, billed, and reconciled. Whether you are out there “pimping uniques and impressions” as some like to say, or selling SaaS model software for selling or buying display ads, or hawking premium data sets to ad networks, exchanges, and DSPs–you are selling the dream. You are an evangelist, a technology tent-revivalist of sorts, going from one campaign event to the next, trying to convince people  to take a nice sip of the technology Kool-Aid It tastes pretty sweet at first.

It seems that, with all the technology and measurement tools, that this business is worthy of being proselytized. We are offering  a world that has changed dramatically for the better. Instead of (in the print days) selling some vague subscriber that is self-described as “recalling your ad” and “passing along the magazine an average of 2.3 times,” you are selling results. Doesn’t matter how they pay for it; in the end, everyone is measuring by CPA (including yours, if your software/media/data cost is counted into the equation). The basis for that CPA comes down to the numbers, and the numbers don’t lie. Or, more precisely, they lie in ways that are harder to argue against.

What you are out there selling is control, which is the ability as a buyer to control exactly who you are reaching, and where they are being reached. Control over pricing, which means knowing how that audience is being valued, whether on an impression-by-impression, or guaranteed future audience. Control over what data you use to make decisions about that audience, and control over the technology you use to disperse your messages across the many screens of the interconnected web. We are far away from the time when the dream of total transparency and control over media is as easy as, say, updating your Facebook profile.

But, after the dust settles and an emerging class of technology winners in the media space emerges, we will see how well the dream was sold…and who ended up really buying it.

(Hopefully it’s not all Google).

Chris O’Hara heads up sales and marketing for TRAFFIQ.

[This article appeared in DIGI:day Daily on 12/2/10]