What are we Selling?

Most of us that are involved in sales, marketing, or business development (they are same thing, actually) in the media space don’t really know what they are selling. And I don’t mean that the sales director or your DSP or data company don’t really understand the way their technology works (which can be the case at times). Surely, the digital media salesman can be relied upon to deploy the latest buzzwords, acronyms, and business jargon at the drop of a two-sided, logo-besmirsched business card. (see everyone’s favorite web humor from the year 2000). We all know what product we are selling.

That doesn’t really cover it, though, does it?

What we are really selling is a dream. The dream of a digital future, and the hope that technology continues to be the solution to the problem, rather than another problem itself. It’s becoming a tough sell out there for a few reasons. I think it all started with the flying car. Ever since the car was invented and the first guy has to wait more than 10 seconds for a traffic light, we have all dreamed of the flying car. The personal hovercraft…essentially the DeLorean from Back to the Future, without the time machine capabilities. That thing was promised to us (coming soon!) way back in the 1950s. It was even clear, not so far back as the 70’s, that we would–with certainty–have something like that by the turn of the century. Well, it’s 2010 and we are all still waiting. The way traffic is getting around New York, Los Angeles and China (they had a traffic jam that lasted a week, recently), we are going to need them soon. Now, even though we still want them, nobody ever talks about them anymore.

I hope that’s not what happens to us. We are out there selling the future of advertising, and the future of how it’s measured, bought, sold, traded, served, shown, billed, and reconciled. Whether you are out there “pimping uniques and impressions” as some like to say, or selling SaaS model software for selling or buying display ads, or hawking premium data sets to ad networks, exchanges, and DSPs–you are selling the dream. You are an evangelist, a technology tent-revivalist of sorts, going from one campaign event to the next, trying to convince people  to take a nice sip of the technology Kool-Aid It tastes pretty sweet at first.

It seems that, with all the technology and measurement tools, that this business is worthy of being proselytized. We are offering  a world that has changed dramatically for the better. Instead of (in the print days) selling some vague subscriber that is self-described as “recalling your ad” and “passing along the magazine an average of 2.3 times,” you are selling results. Doesn’t matter how they pay for it; in the end, everyone is measuring by CPA (including yours, if your software/media/data cost is counted into the equation). The basis for that CPA comes down to the numbers, and the numbers don’t lie. Or, more precisely, they lie in ways that are harder to argue against.

What you are out there selling is control, which is the ability as a buyer to control exactly who you are reaching, and where they are being reached. Control over pricing, which means knowing how that audience is being valued, whether on an impression-by-impression, or guaranteed future audience. Control over what data you use to make decisions about that audience, and control over the technology you use to disperse your messages across the many screens of the interconnected web. We are far away from the time when the dream of total transparency and control over media is as easy as, say, updating your Facebook profile.

But, after the dust settles and an emerging class of technology winners in the media space emerges, we will see how well the dream was sold…and who ended up really buying it.

(Hopefully it’s not all Google).

Chris O’Hara heads up sales and marketing for TRAFFIQ.

[This article appeared in DIGI:day Daily on 12/2/10]


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